Getting over the hump


Jeremy:

I thought this advice from Photographer Ming Thein was a good reminder in the event of a photography advancement slump.

Enjoy

Originally posted on Ming Thein | Photographer:

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There comes a point in the growth of every photographer where they reach a ‘hump’ which appears to be insurmountable in any obvious way: you just don’t think you can get any better, no matter what you do. This may be at a very low level, or a very high one; depending on your natural visual aptitude. But it happens to everybody – it’s happened to me several times in the past. Today I’d like to talk about things you can do to move past it and up your game. After all, everybody wants to make better images, right?

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Oh NO!!! Tea Party Patriot, 46, Charged With Receiving And Distributing Child Pornography


From the Smoking Gun and arrest report:

After President Barack Obama posed for a selfie at Nelson Mandela’s memorial service, Tea Party patriot Brian Schwanke raced to his Facebook page to post a story about how Michelle Obama was purportedly infuriated by her husband’s impromptu shoulder-to-shoulder snapshot with Denmark’s fetching Prime Minister Helle Thorning-Schmidt.

“What a classy president we have. His wife has to sit between him to make “lil Barry “behave,” wrote Schwanke, whose Facebook page reports that the United States “WAS founded on a CHRISTIAN foundation, and the progressive, atheist left is running us into the ground to create a Socialist country that will fall like all the others.”

But Obama’s self-portrait and the left’s treachery are the least of Schwanke’s troubles these days.

The 46-year-old Michigan resident was named today in a federal criminal complaint charging him with distributing and receiving child pornography. Schwanke, pictured above, allegedly used the e-mail account hornypastor@outlook.com to trade hundreds of revolting photos and videos.

Read on. 

Here’s the church. Here’s the steeple. Open the doors, and here’s the, wait, where’d everybody go?


The American Scholar’s Jim Hinch wrote this article about the decline of Evangelical Christianity in America. Here’s a snip:

Just 10 years ago, evangelical Christianity appeared to be America’s dominant religious movement. Evangelicals, more theologically diverse and open to the secular world than their fundamentalist brethren, with whom they’re often confused, were on the march toward political power and cultural prominence. They had the largest churches, the most money, influential government lobbyists, and in the person of President George W. Bush, leadership of the free world itself. Indeed, even today most people continue to regard the United States as the great spiritual exception among developed nations: a country where advances in science and technology coexist with stubborn, and stubbornly conservative, religiosity. But the reality, largely unnoticed outside church circles, is that evangelicalism is not only in gradual decline but today stands poised at the edge of a demographic and cultural cliff. The most recent Pew Research Center survey of the nation’s religious attitudes, taken in 2012, found that just 19 percent of Americans identified themselves as white evangelical Protestants—five years earlier, 21 percent of Americans did so. Slightly more (19.6 percent) self-identified as unaffiliated with any religion at all, the first time that group has surpassed evangelicals. (It should be noted that surveying Americans’ faith lives is notoriously difficult, since answers vary according to how questions are phrased, and respondents often exaggerate their level of religious commitment. Pew is a nonpartisan research organization with a track record of producing reliable, in-depth studies of religion. Other equally respected surveys—Gallup, the General Social Survey—have reached conclusions about Christianity’s status in present-day America that agree with Pew’s in some respects and diverge in others.)