Jesus lobs a controversy bomb into the Nova Scotia school system, leaves, says, “Deal with it, people.”

May 3, 2012

Did you hear about the Nova Scotian grade 12 student whose High School principal suspended him for wearing a shirt promoting Jesus?

Well, if you didn’t, you probably will.

Like, now.

Here’s the story.

A student in Nova Scotia, named William Swinimer, loves Jesus so much he wears the above shirt to school day after day for several weeks. Teachers and students cry that it’s offensive. The Principal warns the student not to wear the shirt to school. He continues to wear it, citing “Jesus and I are dating. And he wants me to wear the shirt every day.”

Jesus has been surprisingly quiet about their relationship, which is expected from a non-existent deity who is more powerful than a zillion suns.

Regular reading Jude, who sent me this article as a recommendation to post, says that he doesn’t mind that William wore this shirt, as long as he can wear a shirt that says “God doesn’t exist.”

I agree with Jude.

But where I have to throw my hands up and shake my Fosse hands is when a student wears the same goddamn t-shirt to school for “several weeks” in a row.

Does this kid have no respect for his classmates? Is he looking for a target to be painted on his head to be the kid who only has ONE shirt.

William Swinimer is asking for it, if you ask me.

I could give two shits if Swinimer has a love affair with an imaginary friend.

Hey, Swinimer, do yourself a favor and fill your closet with variations of Jesus love shirts.

Hey, Nova Scotia, pull your collective heads out of your asses and let William be. He’s got every right to wear that stupid shirt. Just not every day. The stink alone has got to be offensive.

And rightly so!

Now that I’ve slammed this situation into the lockers as hard as I can, what do you think?

Thanks, Jude!


The Reason Rally landed a corporate sponsor

March 15, 2012

Over at Skeptic Money, Phil Ferguson is reporting that the Reason Rally, held at the end of the month at the same time as Photoshop World, will have a corporate sponsor.

Was that first sentence long enough for you?

And the corporate sponsor is …

Polaris Financial Planning. Info here. 

Polaris Financial Planning is committed to supporting the growing secular movement in the United States and donates at least 10% of all revenue to support this cause.

I was hoping to go to both of these events — the Reason Rally and Photoshop World — but I have three jobs that weekend. I wish I could have my cake, eat it, too, and swim in it.

All the big guns, if you can call them that, are going to be there, Lawrence Krauss, Adam Savage, Tim Minchin, Eddie Izzard, Richard Dawkins, James Randi and Jessica Ahlquist, the 17-year-old high schooler who defeated religion in her school — as if I want to see a high schooler speak.

Have we not taken enough notes from religion that have to herald a teenager?

Insert rolled eyes.

For full disclosure, I’m pretty sure Polaris Financial Company is Phil Ferguson’s company, which he should probably mention in his post. But you can’t knock it. The way to grow a company is to promote the hell out of it.

Via 


Gotta Reblog: TYWKIWDBI, The “ovarian lottery.” Brooklyn, N.Y., 1947

December 17, 2011

I was over at one of my new favorite haunts, TYWKIWDBI, and I read a post called, “The “ovarian lottery.” Brooklyn, N.Y., 1947” (link to post).

I never heard that Warren Buffet referred to where you’re born as the “ovarian lottery,” but it’s the perfect verbal representation of why most poor are poor, rich are rich, Christians are Christians, Muslims are Muslims, and on and on and on.

Here is the picture and text that TYWKIWDBI posted. It’s food for thought.

I was one year old when this photo was taken, so that little kid in the window and I are contemporaries.  Our lives have been quite different.

Warren Buffett referred to that situation as the “ovarian lottery.”  It’s the single most important thing in your entire life.


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