Mary Kate and Ashley – Adorably Racist


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“Hocus-pocus phantasm”


Next November, Thomas Jefferson‘s 86-page bible will go on display at The Smithsonian. Jefferson is a hotly debated “founding father” because of this shortened bible. In letters, he claimed he was a Christian, but his slice and dice of the holy book garnered him name callings as awesome as “howling atheist” and “a confirmed infidel” known for “vilifying the divine word, and preaching insurrection against God.”

From an article in WSJ:

To readers familiar with the New Testament, this Jefferson Bible, as it is popularly called, begins and ends abruptly. Rather than opening, as does the Gospel of John, in the beginning with the Word, Jefferson raises his curtain on a political and economic drama: Caesar’s decree that all the world should be taxed. His story concludes with this hybrid verse: “There laid they Jesus, and rolled a great stone to the door of the sepulcher, and departed.” Between these points, there are no angels, no wise men, and not a hint of the resurrection.

After completing this second micro-testament, Jefferson claimed in a letter to a friend that it demonstrated his bona fides as a Christian. “It is a document in proof that I am a real Christian, that is to say, a disciple of the doctrines of Jesus.”

That, of course, has been hotly debated from the election of 1800 to today, and Jefferson has been called an infidel, a Deist and more. What is most clear is that he was not a traditional Christian. He unequivocally rejected the Nicene Creed, which has defined orthodoxy for most Christians since 381. And he was contemptuous of the doctrine of the Trinity, calling it “mere Abracadabra” and “hocus-pocus phantasm.”

 

Regrets of the Typical American


Surprise, surprise … Americans regret decisions they’ve made regarding romance.

Here’s a link to a study about Americans’ regrets. You might want to check it out.

A snippet:

Key findings from the study include:

  • About 44 percent of women reported romance regrets versus 19 percent of men. Women also had more family regrets than men. About 34 percent of men reported having work-oriented regrets versus 27 percent of women reporting similar regrets. Men also had more education regrets than women.
  • Individuals who were not currently in a relationship were most likely to have romance regrets.
  • People were evenly divided on regrets of situations that they acted on versus those that they did not act on. People who regretted events that they did not act on tended to hold on longer to that regret over time.
  • Individuals with low levels of education were likely to regret their lack of education. Americans with high levels of education had the most career-related regrets.