Fostering a culture of Carrorism and doing conscious acts of kindness

About a year ago, I was moved by the social media updates of a model friend of mine named Nasreen Ameri. Her posts were usually about new work or travel associated with her amazing career. She traveled back and forth to New York City. She worked all over, seemingly all the time.

In what appeared to be an abrupt move, she left her successful modeling career to lead a movement of a philosophy she created. Then her posts were photos of heart shapes she found everywhere: in the concrete, in fruit, leaves, laundry, strings, etc.

She shared the images and coupled them with words of encouragement and kindness.

In a landscape infiltrated by acts of terrorism, Nasreen decided the world needed a new look on the old concept of do-gooderism.

She discovered that there was no word in the English dictionary for the opposite of terrorism. So she called her movement “Carrorism” and set her sights on doing conscious acts of kindness and encouraging those behaviors in others.

This struck me. I needed this movement. I loved it. It was so positive. It was a breath of fresh air.

Like most people last year and this one, my energy was sucked dry by the constant barrage of negative news, the endless Trumpian tweets, the incessant news coverage a country so divided by politics and humanity that it became almost impossible to keep a level head about life.

In person, most of us treat everyone else with compassion and empathy. But online, there seems to be a constant battle of who can post the stupidest meme calling “the other side” the dumbest possible person in existence.

I grew up in an evangelical Christian area of the southeast, and I was in love with Christianity as a young person through my early 20s. Nasreen’s philosophy, despite how great it is, would have been demonized by the leaders of my youth. There’s only one way to live, and that’s as a Christian. Nasreen’s philosophy doesn’t include any of that. Not necessarily.

I’ve since left the faith of my youth, but I’ve maintained a lot of disciplines and do-gooderisms of that upbringing. Sometimes I think of myself as a better Christian than most Christians. I know, I’m pompous. The only difference is I don’t believe in the divinity of Christ, just the actions of doing right, at a near extreme cost.

Nasreen’s call for monetary support

In one post, I was struck by Nasreen’s call to help her with a monetary contribution or subscription to help her on a monthly basis. I sat slumped in my chair, because that kind of donation wasn’t in the cards. But I wanted to help.

I slept on it, and I woke up thinking: I will do a documentary on her, for her, about her.

The idea was simple at first, but once production started, it became a bigger project. It was also a very expensive project. I ended up damaging a vintage car during one day of shooting, that threw off my game and I screwed up the settings on my A camera as a result of being completely flustered.

But the production continued. It was difficult not to have a positive attitude when around Nasreen. She constantly finds the positive in all situations. We need

I could honestly do full-length documentary about her.

In free time, I produced this video. I hope you take a look and I hope you enjoy it.

 

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