Breaking with my Nazi past


I often joke that I grew up at Krispie Kreme, a donut shop that originated out of North Carolina and gained national popularity in the 2000s. My parents took us to KK almost every day after school. They loved a cup of coffee and something sweet, I think. It was something to do. Something to break up the day.  A place to meet others. A place to gossip and share stories.

Like the TV show cheers, when we walked in to KK, the whole place would call out to my dad or mom. We knew the staff and almost everyone who frequented there.

It was also a social thing for them. My folks never went to bars that I know of. And at the time, they didn’t smoke cigarettes. But the seating at this KK was circular bar stools anchored to the ground right up against a counter and almost everyone in North Carolina smoked. It was the Paris of its day.

My dad loved going to KK every day for a cup of coffee or two to talk politics, local and world events. When we left KK, we wreaked of cigarette smoke and deep fried glaze.

I joke with Tina that after every cavity I ever had filled at the dentist, my mom made sure to stop by KK afterwards for a cup of coffee. My siblings and I would get two donuts a piece. My donut of choice was chocolate glazed.

Inadvertently, I invested a lot of time into bellying up to the counter at Krispie Kreme Donuts.

You can imagine my surprise today when I read a story from Slate.com revealing that the family that owns KK, as well as Panara Bread, Caribou Coffee & Pret a Manger, recently discovered that its owners family supported Adolf Hitler and extensively used forced labor.

One of Germany’s richest families is coming to terms with a disturbing past. The family that owns a controlling stake in Krispy Kreme Doughnuts and Panera Bread, among others, will donate $11 million to charity after learning that their ancestors were staunch supporters of Adolf Hitler and extensively used force labor.

The family announced its planned charitable donation after Bild newspaper published a report showing how Albert Reimann Sr. and Albert Reimann Jr. used Russian civilians and French prisoners of war as forced laborers during World War II. The Reimann family, which has an estimated wealth of 33 billion euros, or $37 billion, did not dispute the findings of the newspaper’s report. “It is all correct,” spokesman Peter Harf, told the newspaper. “Reimann senior and Reimann junior were guilty … they belonged in jail.”

I must admit. I always got a bad feeling when I left KK. At the time, I thought it was only the stomach ache from stomaching two chocolate glazed donuts every day of my childhood.

But this makes so much more sense. My Nazi-o-meter was trying to tell me that our hard-earned money was supporting a family responsible for destroying so many Jews, as well as so many families and people that the Nazis deemed inferior.

But the family is trying to make good by donating a whole $11,000,000 to an undisclosed charity. Donating $11M — when the family is worth $37 billion — is like finding change in the crevices of your couch and putting into the cup of a guy begging in front of a Dunkin’ Donuts.

And look, Panara Bread is also under this company’s umbrella. So now I understand why I don’t feel well spending my money there either.

We’ll probably find out that the Reimann’s donated their $11M to a company called RWSDT, also known as … Russians Who Support Donald Trump.

Advertisements

Let’s celebrate another growth spurt


The 2018 GSS was just released and there’s some big news. Those of “no religion” (23.1%) are statistically the same size as evangelicals (22.8%). There was also a small resurgence of mainline Protestants, while Catholics are down 3% in the last four years.

I’ve been quiet-er lately because of a few things going on in my world. But I have been meaning to post this video as well. It’s from the Atheist Experience, a TV call-in show that I occasionally watch.

In this episode, a man’s sons get their dad to call in. The kids are fans of the show, and their dad has been growing away from his dogmatic past thanks to reading different books with different perspectives.

There’s a part where the dad sits down with one of his sons and admits he was wrong on so many aspects of faith. And like many people who grow up and out of faith, he’s now teetering on the idea that all faiths have merit. I remember being taught how evil that was, but it’s merely a stepping stone to the giant, not so giant leap to acknowledging that not believing in the Judeo-Christian God is as simple as not believing in any other god.

It’s a good episode.

USA ranked number 19 on list of world’s happiest countries. Socialistic Countries number 1-18. 😀


I can vouch for this dude’s self-reflected evolution and change of perspective


realitycheck.jpg

For me, it wasn’t the internet that changed my mind about the environment I grew up in. It was travel. And the more I travel, the more I live, the more I see it doesn’t have to be the “old” way … give or take.

I continue struggling with the idea that I shouldn’t travel and enjoy my life. That work is SOOOO important, more important than pleasure. Those who place too much emphasis on work and not on the joys of life are dead wrong.

The internet has been instrumental in other changes in my life, exposure to the idea that religion is a good foundation, but continuous personal evolution and not sticking to the repetition of old ideas, but constantly assimilating new ones is more important.

I like seeing the positive evolution of others and the sharing of ideas like these. To the writer of this, whoever Sam474 is, high five and cheers.

The speed of walking explained


Ask A Native New Yorker: Why Do New Yorkers Walk So Fast?

New Yorkers do not walk too fast: You walk too slow. Most likely you grew up in a place where people got around in cars, which means your walking muscles are weak compared with those of people who get everywhere on foot. We also know where we’re going, which makes us appear to be moving faster, but really, it’s just that you are lost half the time, stopping to get your bearings, or else looking up to admire the skyscrapers we stopped being impressed by many years ago.