We bought a house in NC, Part Deux!

A few of you watched the first episode of our journey buying an investment property in North Carolina. Here’s part two.

In it, we wrap up our renovations. We hired a contractor to redo both bathrooms and the kitchen, as well as paint throughout.

In my journal from the experience, I wrote about how my parents had become our best friends. We saw them more regularly than any of my friends or my brother or his family. My dad came over often to help with different bigger ticket jobs that I couldn’t possibly do myself. My mom hemmed our curtains and hung wall paper. It was a huge group effort.

The house has been renting on the social media home sharing sites. We’ve had five or more bookings so far and have it booked through Christmas off and on.

It’s a challenge being this far away from the house. But so far it’s been great and seemingly rewarding of an effort.

Enjoy part two. And if you want to skip to before and afters around 6:20.

A new family portrait

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Two nights before we returned to Chicago from our new house in the south, Tina and I raced to complete at least one new portrait. Inspired by a few different photographers including Greg Crewdson, we photographed each other separately and then plugged the image we wanted into the scene.

The room itself was photographed separately as well.

I love that Talulah made the cut. She was walking making sure she made an appearance.

 

Boomerang this: The first filmed solar eclipse

The film was taken by British magician turned pioneering filmmaker Nevil Maskelyne on an expedition by the British Astronomical Association to North Carolina on 28 May, 1900. This was Maskelyne’s second attempt to capture a solar eclipse. In 1898 he travelled to India to photograph an eclipse where succeeded but the film can was stolen on his return journey home. It was not an easy feat to film. Maskelyne had to make a special telescopic adapter for his camera to capture the event. This is the only film by Maskelyne that we know to have survived.

David Attenborough Hosts “Climate Change: The Facts”

From the BBC:

Sir David’s new programme laid out the science behind climate change, the impact it is having right now and the steps that can be taken to fight it.

“In the 20 years since I first started talking about the impact of climate change on our world, conditions have changed far faster than I ever imagined,” Sir David stated in the film.

“It may sound frightening, but the scientific evidence is that if we have not taken dramatic action within the next decade, we could face irreversible damage to the natural world and the collapse of our societies.”

Speaking to a range of scientists, the programme highlighted that temperatures are rising quickly, with the world now around 1C warmer than before the industrial revolution.