How about a quote collection?

You can say I’m milking the quotes I pulled from Tim Ferriss’ book Tribe of Mentors all you want. I’m having a great time reviewing them to see what sparked encouragement to me, and I hope that they encourage you.

There are these two from Max Levchin, a computer scientist:
“Whenever there is any doubt, there is no doubt.” The line is from the inimitable David Mamet, a quote from Ronin, one of my all-time favorite movies. A laconic reminder to always be decisive in battle and in business, and at a most basic level, to trust your gut.
And:
“The difference between winning and losing is most often not quitting.” This famous line from Walt Disney on willpower cannot be more true when it comes to entrepreneurship.

Having an idea and sticking it out till it’s completed became my earliest memory of how to do things. Whether it was chores my mom had for me or little art projects as a kid. This discipline has stuck with me longer and through times when my closest friends and supporters couldn’t find a way to do the same thing.

I love this next one from Dita Von Teese, a burlesque dancer:

“You can be a juicy ripe peach and there’ll still be someone who doesn’t like peaches.”

I find this quote to be true of so much, like music, religion, car purchase, diet regimen, book or movie passion, etc. You might have the juiciest, peachiest faith and belief system, but I’ll be damned if I’m going to get hungry for it. You can LOVE country music and expose me to your favorite tracks, but the likelihood is I’m not going to add it to any of my playlists. I’m sorry not sorry.

This principle works multiple ways. Some people kinda like peaches, so they don’t mind one once in a while. Others like it in their pie, maybe in a candy, but not raw. Point is, some people kinda like religion, but they don’t full on LOVE the one someone else is selling.

And that’s okay! You’re okay. They’re okay. We’re all okay.

And finally, this last 1.15 is from Neil Strauss, author and journalist.

The audiobook I’ve given away most is Nonviolent Communication by Marshall Rosenberg. Though “nonviolent communication” is poorly named (it’s the equivalent of calling cuddling “nonmurderous touching”), the central idea is that, unbeknownst to us, there’s a lot of violence in the way we communicate with others—and with ourselves. That violence comes in the form of blaming, judging, criticizing, insulting, demanding, comparing, labeling, diagnosing, and punishing. So when we speak in certain ways, not only do we not get heard, but we end up alienating others and ourselves. NVC has a magical way of instantly defusing potential conflicts with anyone, from a partner to a server to a friend to someone at work. One of its many great premises is that no two people’s needs are ever in conflict. It’s only the strategies for getting those needs met that are in conflict. Disambiguation: The version you want is a 5-hour, 9-minute lecture. You can recognize it by the cover, which is a close-up of a hand flashing a peace sign. It starts slow, but then gets revolutionary. Do *not* get any versions of the printed book, which has the same title.

And finally, which I’m reminded of a lot in general:

“Learn more, know less.”

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